What is MUN?

Here’s a hint: It doesn’t involve Runway Models

Model United Nations is an activity that seeks to simulate the proceedings of the United Nations. Through Model UN, or MUN, participants learn a lot about international politics and have a blast the same time! These simulations take place at conferences, which are held at the high school and college level all across the country. At these conferences, delegates get to represent member-states of the United Nations or unique characters as they face either preplanned topics or unpredictable crises–both of which test their skills in diplomacy. Model United Nations at UCLA hosts both a high school and college level conference. For a great explanation of what MUN is, check out this summary from Best Delegate about the activity.

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Club members attend Kofi Annan's Luskin Lecture for Thought Leadership at Royce Hall.

Who are we?

Model United Nations at UCLA is a student organization run by a dedicated staff of undergraduates with an interest in international relations. We are one of just several comprehensive American collegiate MUN programs that have the ability to host a high school conference, a college conference, and field a competitive travel team.

Our high school conference is among the largest and most prestigious in the United States and annually draws over 1000 delegates from all regions of the U.S. and from around the world. Our college conference is known for its innovative committees and has attracted some of the top college MUN teams in the country.

The travel team is competitive in the intercollegiate MUN circuit and has won many awards. The team has recently participated in conferences hosted by Georgetown, UC Berkeley, UC Santa Barbara, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Chicago, and McGill University, 

Members are also active leaders within the greater MUN community and provide outreach or staff for the United Nations Association’s Global Classrooms conferences in Los Angeles and New York. Recent alumni are now at top law schools, business firms, and selective programs such as the Peace Corps.

Are you a UCLA student looking to get involved with our club? Check out the member portal for more information.

What is the United Nations?

So what does the United Nations do, anyway? The basic premise of the organization is best explained by the organization itself:

The United Nations is an international organization founded in 1945 after the Second World War by 51 countries committed to maintaining international peace and security, developing friendly relations among nations and promoting social progress, better living standards and human rights.

The UN has 4 main purposes:

  1. To keep peace throughout the world;
  2. To develop friendly relations among nations;
  3. To help nations work together to improve the lives of poor people, to conquer hunger, disease and illiteracy, and to encourage respect for each other’s rights and freedoms;
  4. To be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations to achieve these goals.

Due to its unique international character, and the powers vested in its founding Charter, the Organization can take action on a wide range of issues, and provide a forum for its 192 Member States to express their views, through the General Assembly, the Security Council, the Economic and Social Council and other bodies and committees.

The work of the United Nations reaches every corner of the globe. Although best known for peacekeeping, peacebuilding, conflict prevention and humanitarian assistance, there are many other ways the United Nations and its System (specialized agencies, funds and programmes) affects our lives and works to improve the world. The Organization works on a broad range of fundamental issues, from sustainable development, environment and refugees protection, disaster relief, counter terrorism, disarmament and non-proliferation, to promoting democracy, human rights, gender equality and the advancement of women, governance, economic and social development and international health, clearing landmines, expanding food production, and more, in order to achieve its goals and coordinate efforts for a safer world for this and future generations.